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How to survive the lockdown tips and the November meeting with Norwegian colleagues

How to survive the lockdown tips and the November meeting with Norwegian colleagues

Based on information from the September meeting with our Norwegian lecturers, we have prepared
and published the How to Survive Lockdown infographic, which provides tips on how to deal with the
limitations and uncertainty that we face in the current situation associated with the COVID-19
pandemic.
In November, through another virtual meeting, we focused on sharing and reconciling home-office
and distance learning, where parents are often exposed to increased stress associated with
reconciling their own work with supporting children in online teaching. We discussed number of
useful tips that can help parents as well as children. It is very important, for example, to have regular
and fixed moments of recharging "emotional batteries" during the day, when we give the child all our
attention and ensure that his emotional needs are met, for example by hugging or brief cuddling.
Thanks to these regular moments, the time when children can work independently is extended and
parents can thus fully concentrate on their own work.

We are preparing materials and meetings…

We are preparing materials and meetings…

We are currently translating a text of our Norwegian lecturers, which will become a key study script for teachers and other pedagogical staff who will be trained in the new educational programme. The purpose of the text is to help the trainees understand why even the best teaching methods offered by the current pedagogy fail when we are working with children suffering from developmental trauma. In the text, teachers will find valuable advice that can help them teach such children. Developmental trauma affects the development of the brain. Knowledge of the impact of childhood in fear and conditions of inadequate and insufficient care can help us understand why these children misbehave in school. Understanding the causes of challenging behavior of children with developmental trauma can help significantly and make teaching and caring for these children a little easier.

The script provides readers with information on procedures and measures that can help children with developmental trauma cope with daily schooling. It aims to provide a deeper understanding of the developmental trauma, its impact on children, and their education. It also contains practical recommendations on how to reduce the impact of trauma on the child’s education.

In September, we are planning to implement yet another two-day training in Prague, to which we again plan to invite (epidemiological situation permits) our Norwegian lecturers. Their visit will also include a seminar at the Ministry of Health targeting health and social services involved in the reform of mental health care. The seminars will also be attended by lecturers of lifelong education of pedagogical staff in matters related to the behaviour of children at school.

The planned two-day training took place online

The planned two-day training took place online

Like all of us measures restricting travel affected us at ńĆOSIV, so we had to replace the originally planned two-day training with our Norwegian lecturers in Prague to a virtual environment. We divided the training into three days to support the concentration of attention of the trainees. The training topic was more than suitable – the activation of the stress response system and the effects of stress on behavior.
The change of established habits and routines, combined with the uncertainty of what and how will happen next, has given us all an authentic experience of increased levels of stress. Nevertheless, we tried to maintain a positive mood and together we thought about how best to support children and teachers after returning to schools.

Interview with Kaja Naes Johannessen

Interview with Kaja Naes Johannessen

Interview with our colleague from partner organisation √ėstbytunet on education of children with challenging behaviour was published at on-line magazine Rodice vitani.

“I know¬† it’s not easy with these kids. But adults are adults and should be better able to control themselves than a child. We should learn ways to treat and helpthese children. Of course, this is not easy, because when a child dissolves in emotions, it evokes strong feelings in us adults as well. Cortisol also floodsus and we feel like runnig away or attacking.”There is no easy way to deal with this, and the following is especially recommended: try to recognize the child’s signs of a affect approaching,
and try to stop it before it starts. The sooner we intervene, the more tools we have at our disposal.When we see that a child is getting restless, he is getting a little angry, so as adults we have a chance to work with him. As soon as he starts and we start withbans and punishments, the whole situation will escalate and we will not have many options. The affective arc is practically impossible to be stopped when it starts”.

The whole interview is available here.

First meeting with lecturers from √ėstbytunet,

First meeting with lecturers from √ėstbytunet,

On June 20th to 21st November 2019, we first met with lecturers from √ėstbytunet, our partner organization; we met in a group composed of the ńĆOSIV staff, our partners from the √ėstbytunet centre, and participants of the educational program ‚Äď lecturers in training who will, after having taken the training under the umbrella of the project, train pedagogical staff in techniques of supporting children with demanding behavior due to developmental trauma. At the meeting, the lecturers presented to us details of the system of services to help vulnerable children in Norway explained the targets of the educational programme and its main theoretical base. We sat down to plan our visit to the √ėstbytunet centre and the lecturers delivered their first seminar for the public at the Department of Pedagogy of Charles University. The seminar, lectured by Kaja N√¶ss Johannessen and Ann Karin Bakken, two experienced psychologists, was remarkable and the response of participants was enormous. For a videorecording of this public seminar, please see our Inspiromat Support For Inclusion.